News Back Then – July 17, 2013

News-Back-Then-Banner

Williams Farmer • August 16, 1935
SITES STONE MAY BE USED IN BAY BRIDGE

 The little town of Sites, west of Maxwell, which in years gone by, was a lively and prosperous community, may again take on life due to the possibility of the stone quarry being again put into operation. Representatives of the McGinvary Construction Company of Sacramento and San Francisco recently surveyed the quarry to determine whether there was sufficient rock for rip-rapping approaches to the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge.

The quarry at one time employed large number of men and a steady payroll was released at the town of Sites regularly. A branch road of Southern Pacific Railroad, was built into the town and rock, which was the best to be found for building construction, was shipped to all points. Some of the most important buildings in San Francisco were constructed of stone from the Sites quarry. Among those are the Ferry building, St. Francis Hotel and the Flood Building. The J. J. O’Rourke building in Colusa, one of the best in the county, was built of stone from the Sites Quarry.

It is hoped that the construction officials of the bay bridge will see the wisdom of using the local rock for the work on the huge bridge and the quarry will again hum with activities of men and machinery cutting stone and preparing it for shipment to the construction operations at the bay bridge.

 

June 2, 1939
HUGE FIRE IN FOOTHILL SECTION BURNS 65,000 ACRES

 A fire thought to have been started by a tractor on the Hermann Dunlap range where wood was being cut and traveling at a rapid rate in the hills of western Colusa county is still burning at this time. The fire was discovered in a canyon west of the Black Mountain School on Tuesday. With a high north wind the flames spread rapidly, soon having a large front. The fire has spread now, and, encircling the hill community of Sites and on the west has burned to the East Park dam.

Last Evening Fire Wardens sent by the state to take charge of the situation at the request of the board of supervisors passed through Williams on their return to Sacramento. They stated that approximately 65,000 acres were burned over. The territory burned was 16 miles long and eight miles wide at one end and six miles wide on the other. Much feed was destroyed, however little grain was destroyed.

Men were taken to the fire Wednesday evening in an attempt to stop the spread. They returned to Williams Thursday afternoon after putting in twenty four hours on the fire-line and reported the fire under control at the south end. It had progressed to High Valley and had burned around the Boardman grain field, which was well protected.

 

JUNE 24, 1949
LARGE SUM CLEARED ON HOMECOMING DANCE

 Approximately $250 was cleared at the Swimming Pool benefit dance held in the high school gym last Saturday night. The sale of luscious homemade cakes was a feature of the evening.

Dancing was enjoyed to the tunes of Jack Forsythe’s orchestra and the ladies of the Auxiliary were in charge of the hot dogs and coke concession.

While the crowd was fairly large, the nature of the benefit should have attracted many more. An advance sale of tickets helped somewhat in swelling the proceeds to form the nucleus of a swimming pool fund for Williams.

The no-host supper on the beautiful cool turf at the high school attracted a large crowd all of whom greatly enjoyed the evening.

Following the baseball game, at which Williams defeated Dunnigan by a 6-5 score in the afternoon, a most entertaining musical program was presented with affable Virgil O’Sullivan in the role of M. C. and incidentally he preformed most creditably. Comprising that program were Estelle Laird and Agnes Walker in vocal duets, Dickie Myers in a vocal group accompanied by Vera Silva, vocal duets Leah Rae Hale, and Terry Mock, the latter also favoring with two solos, assisted by Elyse Mock at the piano and a talk on Youth Recreation and a swimming pool for Williams by G. C. Jones, principal of the Williams High School. the program was enthusiastically received by all present.

Serving buffet, a delicious and bountiful no-host supper was enjoyed at long tables, card tables and on the lawn. The Ladies auxiliary was in charge of the supper with Ora Gobel heading the committee assisted by Mary Manor and other members. Delicious home cooked beans, bread, butter, coffee, iced tea, and ice cream were enjoyed as additions to the meal.

 

June 24, 1949
RICHFIELD COMPANY BUILDING STATION

 The Triangle Construction Company of Sacramento is constructing a modern service station for the Richfield Company on the lot where 6th Street joins Highway 99w. The lot has frontage on 6th and 7th Street and is ideally located.

The property is owned by Ben, R. Ragain of Colusa. Two large tanks are on the property and will be installed immediately and the station will be ready to serve the traveling public this summer.

 

June 23,1944
SGT. WAYNE GRISHABER IN PACIFIC BATTLE AREA

The following official news flash comes from : Headquarters Army Air Forces India Burma Sector, China, Burma, India theater, Office of Public relations Officer.

OFFICIAL PRESS NOTE TO THE WILLIAMS FARMER

Shortly after the first transport aircraft had landed at the newly won Myitkina Air Strip, four Tech Sergeants from a troop carrier squadron of Major General George S. Stratemeyer’s Eastern Air command, succeeded in the face of almost continuous enemy fire and a lack of any heavy equipment in removing two 300 pound propellers from a damaged C-47 and installing them in another aircraft 300 yards away.

The sergeants who did the job in seven and one half hours were WAYNE F. GRISHABER of Williams Calif., Robert Remke of East St. Louis, Ill., Oscar R. Broyer, 24, of Sacramento, Calif., and Walter Ohda, of Walnut Ill. They had to take cover more than a dozen times in the high weeds adjoining the strip while the Chinese troops guarding it eliminated the snipers.

Sergeant Boyer, a former student at Milliken College, Decatur, Ill. said that “It was tougher than anything I’ve seen even in Africa, Italy, and Sicily. We dropped paratroopers in Sicily in heavy rifle fire but we had other planes for protection. Here, all we could hope for was that the weeds would prevent them from seeing us too well.

Nice going Wayne, and your Williams friends are surely proud of you!

SHARE
avatar

A lifelong resident of Colusa County, Pat Ash is the Williams Pioneer Reviews, historian for the community of Williams. Publishing the ‘News Back Then’ columns, in the Williams Pioneer Review since 2008. Ash recently published ‘Williams’, a pictorial history book in 2012.