It’s Your Colusa County: Theresa Bright

Theresa BrightTheresa Jeffrey Bright a fourth generation steward of the family farm was called home after her departure in her early teens.

“I always knew in my heart that I would come back home eventually,” said Bright.

“I always knew in my heart that I would come back home eventually,” said Bright.“Comeback Kid” is the term coined by Williams resident and friend, Dixie La Grande. Comeback kids return to their former home community and in the process find the need to reinvent themselves as they integrate back into the local community and perhaps new careers. Theresa Bright is no exception.

“Comeback Kid” is the term coined by Williams resident and friend, Dixie La Grande. Comeback kids return to their former home community and in the process find the need to reinvent themselves as they integrate back into the local community and perhaps new careers. Theresa Bright is no exception. Bright is passionate about history which extends to county history, genealogy, and a heavy dose of historical fiction for her reading pleasure.

Bright is passionate about history which extends to county history, genealogy, and a heavy dose of historical fiction for her reading pleasure.Today, the ranch, named for its original owner, has a recently constructed home, where Bright and her husband Don now reside.

Today, the ranch, named for its original owner, has a recently constructed home, where Bright and her husband Don now reside.The anticipation that leads up to the holidays appeals to Bright and make the late fall her favorite Colusa County season.

The anticipation that leads up to the holidays appeals to Bright and make the late fall her favorite Colusa County season.  “I look forward to the annual Christmas Tyme in Colusa when the streets are closed off, and vendors display gift items, children perform holiday entertainment, and Santa makes an appearance,” said Bright, “I love when community members from all around the different parts of our

“I look forward to the annual Christmas Tyme in Colusa when the streets are closed off, and vendors display gift items, children perform holiday entertainment, and Santa makes an appearance,” said Bright, “I love when community members from all around the different parts of our county come together and enjoy each other’s company and what the event has to offer.”

It is that unity of Colusa County’s people, regardless of which part they reside that Bright especially values. “I buy my meat in Arbuckle, because they have an excellent meat counter, and I purchase produce in Colusa at the store or at the Farmer’s Market,” she said.

“I buy my meat in Arbuckle, because they have an excellent meat counter, and I purchase produce in Colusa at the store or at the Farmer’s Market,” she said.“That’s the beauty of where I am located. It is a center spot in the county, and it doesn’t take long to get where I need to go,” Bright said. “I try to keep it local and spread it around,” she added.

“That’s the beauty of where I am located. It is a center spot in the county, and it doesn’t take long to get where I need to go,” Bright said. “I try to keep it local and spread it around,” she added.Her enthusiasm for period history is the driving force behind Bright’s hobbies and spends time exploring her interests as the Treasurer on the Board of Trustees for the Sacramento Valley Museum.

Her enthusiasm for period history is the driving force behind Bright’s hobbies and spends time exploring her interests as the Treasurer on the Board of Trustees for the Sacramento Valley Museum.“It occurred to me that when I moved back to the ranch, working with the museum might be something I would want to do. I took advantage of the opportunity to learn and use that knowledge here,” she said.

“It occurred to me that when I moved back to the ranch, working with the museum might be something I would want to do. I took advantage of the opportunity to learn and use that knowledge here,” she said.  Interest in intricate handmade lace led Bright to teach herself the art of Bobbin Lace Weaving from books on the subject.

Interest in intricate handmade lace led Bright to teach herself the art of Bobbin Lace Weaving from books on the subject.“Bobbin Lace Weaving is an off-loom weaving technique used to create different types of lace for various applications,” said Bright, “It doesn’t require the perfect vision or manual dexterity that so many handworked art forms rely on.”

“Bobbin Lace Weaving is an off-loom weaving technique used to create different types of lace for various applications,” said Bright, “It doesn’t require the perfect vision or manual dexterity that so many handworked art forms rely on.”  Silversmithing is another artistic endeavor, for Bright. She aims to complete one large sterling silver project annually to be auctioned at the Sacramento Valley Museum’s annual dinner.

Silversmithing is another artistic endeavor, for Bright. She aims to complete one large sterling silver project annually to be auctioned at the Sacramento Valley Museum’s annual dinner.

“I’m finding that farming keeps me incredibly busy, and I don’t have the time to do everything, but I can do this,” she said.
When not weaving bobbin lace or silversmithing, Bright can be found selling Pecans grown on the family farm during the summer months at both the Colusa and Arbuckle Farmers Market. Bright’s love for the preservation of history has helped her contribute back to the community she has known to love.