Maxwell FFA Rallies for Breast Cancer

Maxwell FFA took to the football field last Friday to show their support for those battling cancer. FFA members wore pink, and stood in the shape of the awareness ribbon as they released balloons in memory of those who've lost the battle with the disease.  (Cheri Azevedo) Williams Pioneer Review
Maxwell FFA took to the football field last Friday to show their support for those battling cancer. FFA members wore pink, and stood in the shape of the awareness ribbon as they released balloons in memory of those who’ve lost the battle with the disease. (Cheri Azevedo) Williams Pioneer Review

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women in the United States next to skin cancer. According to the Center for Disease Control, it is the second leading cause of cancer death in women after lung cancer.

Last Friday, the Maxwell FFA and entire student body showed their support for all those fighting and who have fought against Breast Cancer. Guest speaker Marion Mathis spoke about her newly diagnosed journey with breast cancer.

“I remember vividly, it was April 22, 2016, when I found a lump from a self check. Men and women both should be administering self checks. It’s important that men also understand they too can be a victim to breast cancer, not just a woman,” said Mathis during the rally.

Mathis started her recovery process against cancer Oct. 6, with her first of many chemotherapy treatments.

“I have been open about my diagnosis. I want everyone to know just how important it is to get yourself checked,” said Mathis.

Breast cancer bracelets, pink and white balloons, and an entire student body wearing pink attire met up on the Maxwell football field where the breast cancer ribbon decorated the field. Students released balloons for all those who have lost their lives to breast cancer.

“We are a supportive community and we come together yearly to let those individuals who have been or affected by breast cancer know we care,” said Maxwell High School Junior Gina Jenkins.

For more information about breast cancer, how to find it early, and how to help finish the fight against the disease, contact the American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345 anytime, day or night.