City Fire to sell unused ambulance

The Colusa City Council last week approved a resolution to allow the Colusa City Fire Department to sell the Basic Life Support Unit they purchased in 2016 when countywide ambulance services were first reduced.

Fire Chief Logan Conley said his Strike Team, which responds outside the city during wildfires, would benefit better from a new fire truck in the future than a ambulance-like trasport unit that was used only once.

The Colusa City Council allowed then Chief Randy Dunn to purchased the 2006 vehicle two years ago using Strike Team funds because Colusa officials felt local residents were vulnerable after Enloe reduced ambulance services from two around-the-clock ambulances covering all of Colusa County to just one 24-hour and one 12-hour ambulance due to massive financial losses.

City fire had operated a similar basic ambulance service back in the 1990s, prior to the county contracting with Enloe for services, but Conley said state regulations now regarding the training of personnel make the endeavor too expensive for such little demand.

“The need is just not there,” he said.

Conley said Enloe was willing to purchase the unit for $15,000, which is just a $1,000 loss to the city.

Supervisor John Loudon, whose special district funds added an additional $10,000 for the city to purchase equipment for the unit, said he did not have a problem with the sale of the vehicle.

Although the Basic Life Support Unit looked like an ambulance, is was actually designed to be just an inter-facility transportation and pre-hospital response to ill or injured patients.

The unit required staffing with just emergency medical responders, rather than an Advanced Life Support unit, which require a minimum of one paramedic and emergency medical technician.

While Colusa County subsidized ambulance services for Enloe to operate two full-time ambulances during the period the hospital was closed, that arrangement ended Oct. 1, and Enloe is now back to providing one 24-hour ambulance stationed in Williams, and one 12-hour ambulance stationed in Colusa.

Conley said during an emergency in which both ambulances are engaged, ambulances from out of the area, such as Willows, would provide back-up services if needed.